5 Reasons Your Baby Wants to Breastfeed AGAIN
5 Reasons Your Baby Wants to Breastfeed AGAIN | Baby Chick

By Meg Nagle

Published author and owner of TheMilkMeg.com

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In between breastfeeding her youngest boy, chasing after her oldest two boys, blogging and occasionally sleeping...Meg works with women to help them reach their breastfeeding goals! Her background is in counselling and sexual health. She was a La Leche League Leader (breastfeeding counsellor) for seven years before becoming an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. Meg is the author of, Boobin' All Day...Boobin' All Night. A Gentle Approach To Sleep For Breastfeeding Families. She was also filmed for a short documentary, "Lactaboobiephobia", based on one of her blog posts which was released in 2016. You can find Meg at www.themilkmeg.com

“Do you think he is just breastfeeding for comfort?”

“My mother told me that surely he doesn’t need to breastfeed so frequently.”


“Why is my baby breastfeeding so much in the late afternoon? Is my supply low?”

Working as an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), I have heard mothers ask these questions all the time. And I know I had these same questions and concerns when I was a new breastfeeding mother. The frequency in which our babies breastfeed is SO much more demanding and confusing than what most of us anticipate. Can you imagine trying to explain to someone how it feels to breastfeed 24/7, without time to even pee, shower or eat?! It’s something you really have to go through to be able to understand. There is a reason behind all of this madness, leaking boobs, and frequently feeding babies . . . and there are many reasons your baby will be asking for a breastfeed, and it’s not just hunger.

Your storage capacity.

Did you know that we all make about the same milk within a 24 hour period? However, we have different storage capacities. Basically, this means that what I can hold at any given time in my glandular tissue (where milk is made and stored) will be different to what you can hold. And no, the size of your breasts has nothing to do with how much milk you can produce and store. Breast size has to do with fatty tissue . . . not glandular breast tissue. What does this have to do with your little frequent breastfeeder? Well, this means that some babies will get a lot of milk at each feed while others will only get a small amount. The babies who get smaller amounts will have to feed more frequently. The smaller storage capacity means more frequent feeds will be needed to fill your baby’s tummy.


Your baby is tired.

Did you know that your breastmilk actually contains ingredients that help your baby fall asleep?! These are called nucleotides and they have been identified as components in milk that help relax and calm your baby. Cuddling your baby and having some skin-to-skin time combined with your milk is the perfect mixture to help relax your baby off to sleep. Besides giving your baby nutrients, this is one of the most important (and common) reasons your baby will ask for a breastfeed. They’d like a cuddle and some milk to help them nod off.

Your baby is in pain.

Suckling at the breast and drinking milk helps to bring pain relief to babies. All you have to do is watch a baby getting their immunizations or a heal prick, while being breastfed, just to see the power of the boob. If your baby is feeling pain due to reflux, diaper rash, a random body pain . . . the list goes on, breastfeeding is what they will seek to help them find some relief from their pain. Newborns cannot manoeuvre themselves easily if they are in pain so breastfeeding is what they will need to help manage this.

Your milk supply needs a boost.

Our babies are much smarter than we often give them credit for. If you are following your baby’s lead (rather than scheduled feeds) you are putting yourself in the best position to be able to make enough milk for your baby. If your baby is going through a growth spurt and needs more milk, they know to breastfeed more frequently. This frequent feeding leads to more milk drained from your breast, which leads to more milk being made! It’s the perfect supply and demand system.

Your baby needs comfort.

When your baby needs comfort, they will ask for a breastfeed and a cuddle. Breastfeeding releases the hormone oxytocin which is often referred to as the, “love hormone.” Oxytocin is involved with making love, birth, and breastfeeding. Oxytocin has been found to create feelings of calm and closeness and it is released in both mother and baby when breastfeeding. If someone asks you, “Oh, you don’t need to breastfeed him again, he is JUST breastfeeding for comfort!” You can help explain to them why this little “comfort” breastfeed is actually really important.

There is not one reason that is more important than another. Breastfeeding for comfort is just as important as breastfeeding for hunger or thirst. Babies seek the breast to answer virtually all of their needs. When in doubt . . . whip it out! You simply cannot overfeed your breastfed baby.

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